The Girl Who Dared to Stand

Please note that this review may contain spoilers for The Girl Who Dared to Think. You can read my review of this novel [here].

The Girl Who Dared to Stand was written by Bella Forrest and first published in 2017. It is a dystopian science fiction story which follows Liana and her dissident friends as they continue to evade capture within the futuristic city of the Tower. The novel forms the second part of the The Girl Who Dared to Think series, following after The Girl Who Dared to Think (2017) and preceding The Girl Who Dared to Descend (2017), The Girl Who Dared to Rise (2017), The Girl Who Dared to Lead (2018), The Girl Who Dared to Endure (2018) and The Girl Who Dared to Fight (2018).

Liana and her friends have managed to find a new sanctuary but they do not know how long they can remain hidden. Devon’s sudden attack cost the lives of two of their allies and the survivors have been left feeling bitter and scared. Yet, in a hidden room beneath the Tower, Liana has found something unexpected. A prototype version of the Scipio AI, left abandoned and detached from the mainframe for three hundred years. Suddenly, she realises that they may have a way to fight back.

However, the most important thing is to first ensure that they can move around unnoticed. This means replacing each of their neural nets to ensure they aren’t picked up by any of the Core’s scans. Unfortunately, nets are not easy to come by. Their production is a closely guarded secret and, even with Mercury’s intel, stealing them from within the Core will be unimaginably dangerous.

Although the heist gets off to a good start, things take a downward turn as Maddox is captured by their enemies. Although Liana wants to mount a rescue, her plan is put on hold as she is unexpectedly approached by another faction of rebels. These mysterious individuals have both the power and influence to redeem her name. However, in exchange for their help, they wish for a terrible favour in return…

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The Runaways and the Everlasting

The Runaways and the Everlasting was first published in 2014 and is Monifa Anderson’s debut novel. It is a horror story that focuses on a group of teenagers who are forced into a deadly game by an all-powerful enemy. The novel stands alone, so you don’t have to read any of the author’s other work to fully appreciate it.

Mariah is sick of her home life. Her father ran off with a younger woman and her mother seems to blame this on her. When she meets Kitch online, she knows that she finally has a chance to escape. Kitch belongs to a group of runaways who have made a home for themselves on the outskirts of London and he’s keen for Mariah to join them.

Mariah heads to meet him and is happy to discover that he’s not some elderly pervert. The Runaways do exist and live quite comfortably together, even though they have all fled from hostile home lives. Although Mariah instantly feels welcome, this is unfortunately short-lived. When one of the Runaways discovers a gold coin in the bathroom, they set off on a treasure hunt in search of more.

Unfortunately, this soon leads the Runaways into danger. The coins were hidden by an ancient and heartless race called the Everlasting and now the Runaways have caught their attention. The Everlasting love to be entertained and so pitch them into a high-stakes game against another team. The losing team will all be killed but the winners will be transformed into Everlasting and lose their humanity. It’s a horrible situation but the Runaways have no choice to play. Their only hope is to find some way to turn the situation to their favour…

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Five Nights at Freddy’s: The Fourth Closet

Please note that this review may contain spoilers for earlier instalments of this series. You can read my reviews of these novels by clicking the links below:

The Silver Eyes | The Twisted Ones

Five Nights at Freddy’s: The Fourth Closet was written by Scott Cawthorn and Kira Breed-Wrisley and first published in 2018. It follows the two previous instalments of this series, The Silver Eyes (2015) and The Twisted Ones (2017) and is based on the popular video game franchise of the same name. At the time of writing, there are no plans for future instalments to this series.

Charlie should have been dead. John saw her bleed out, trapped inside one of the springlock suits. He doesn’t know who the stranger wearing his former girlfriend’s face is but he’s not willing to accept her into his friendship circle like the others have done. There is something off about the way she dresses and presents herself. She may look like Charlie, but she is certainly not her.

As John starts to investigate into Charlie’s past, he uncovers secrets that he could never have imagined. Her Aunt Jen hides boxes of her father’s belongings, and these reveal the shocking truth behind his suicide. Yet someone else is also looking for information about Charlie and they will kill to get it.

At the same time, children have started to disappear all over Hurricane. Jessica is suspicious that these disappearances are linked to the opening of a new diner – Circus Baby’s Pizza – and takes it upon herself to find and rescue the victims. However, hidden beneath the diner, she finds that a madman is in the process of conducting a hideous experiment. Will she be able to stop him or will she become his latest victim?

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The Supervillain and Me

The Supervillain and Me was written in 2018 and is Danielle Banas’s debut novel. It is a science-fiction romance about a girl who slowly starts to fall for a notorious villain when she is asked to help prove his innocence. The novel forms the first part of the Morriston Superheroes series, though at the time of writing no future instalments have been announced.

Morriston City has never been safest of places. Despite the fact that it boasts two active Supers – Red Comet and Fish Boy – its crime rate is so bad that it’s unsafe for any ordinary person to walk the streets without carrying a taser. As the daughter of the mayor and sister of Red Comet, Abby knows this only too well. Her family are so busy trying to make the city a safer place that they don’t seem to spend much time together anymore.

Things get worse still when a new Super appears and burns down the mayor’s office. Dubbed the Iron Phantom by the press, he proves keen to use his powers to cause as much damage as possible. However, Abby isn’t sure quite what to make of this. Before he was revealed to be a villain, the Iron Phantom saved her life and he certainly didn’t strike her as a bad person.

It’s not long before the Iron Phantom shows up in her bedroom and begs her for help. He has reason to believe that the mayor’s office is planning to implant microchips in the general public and he needs to find out why. He also swears to Abby that he is innocent of his crimes and that someone is trying to frame him. Slowly, Abby is drawn into the conspiracy but she can’t help but worry if she is doing the right thing. How can she trust someone if she does not even know who they are, and what would her brother do if he learned that she was helping his arch nemesis?

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Bruja Born

Please note that this review may contain spoilers for Labyrinth Lost. You can read my review of this novel [here].

Bruja Born was written by Zoraida Córdova and first published in 2018. It forms the second instalment of the Brooklyn Brujas series and is set eight months after the events of Labyrinth Lost (2016), as Lula and her family slowly recover from their ordeal in Los Lagos. Although this novel largely stands alone, I would still recommend reading the books in sequence to fully appreciate what is going on.

Lula Mortiz is a shadow of her former self. Although her sister, Alex, saved her from having her soul destroyed by a terrible monster, she has returned to New York traumatised and scared. Her anxiety has caused her relationship with her long-term boyfriend, Maks, to become strained and he eventually breaks it off, leaving Lula nursing a broken heart.

Desperate to keep Maks, Lula tries to use her healing magic to repair the rift between them. Yet, seconds later, disaster strikes. Lula’s school bus is involved in a horrific crash and many of her friends are killed. Although Lula survives, she learns that Maks is in a coma and is not expected to ever recover. When the circle refuses to heal him, Lula knows she needs to take matters into her own hands. Alex, Rose and herself command incredible power between them. It has to be enough to save him.

What should be a simple spell quickly goes wrong. When the Lady de la Muerte arrives to take Maks’s soul, Lula tethers it to herself to save him. While this at first seems to fail, the next day all of the bodies disappear from the hospital morgue. Its not long after that the killings begin. Bodies are showing up mutilated all over New York and Lula somehow knows that they are connected. Now she must find a way to put things right and appease the goddess of death. If she doesn’t, it won’t be long before she draws the attention of those who hunt for bruja…

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Animorphs 54

Please note that this review may contain spoilers for earlier instalments of this series. You can read my reviews of these novels by clicking the links below:

Animorphs: 1-5 | 6-10 | 11-15 | 16-19 | 20-22 | 23-27 | 28-32 | 33-37 | 38-41 | 42-45 | 46-49 | 50-53

Megamorphs: The Andalite’s Gift | In the Time of Dinosaurs | Elfangor’s Secret | Back to Before

Animorphs Chronicles: The Andalite Chronicles | The Hork-Bajir Chronicles | Visser | The Ellimist Chronicles

Wow. It feels weird to say this after two years but I am finally at the end of my retrospective look at K.A. Applegate’s Animorphs series. The series in question ran from 1996 to 2001 and consisted of fifty-four main novels and eight specials. It was also a massive part of my childhood and a source of huge nostalgia for me. For the purpose of this review, I’m only going to be looking at the final novel – The Beginning (2001). Please note that this post will contain massive spoilers for the entire series. You have been warned.

The end has finally come. Visser One has been defeated and the Animorphs have control of the Pool Ship. However, the battle is not over yet. Tom’s rebel band of Yeerks has taken the Blade Ship. The Animorphs have no chance of out-manoeuvring them and their weapons have been drained. Their only hope lies in the Rachel, who has stowed away as a flea on Tom’s head. With the future of the human race hanging the balance, Jake gives the one command he has always feared. He orders Rachel to stop his brother by whatever means necessary.

Rachel’s actions are enough to end the war, allowing the Animorphs to create a hasty agreement with the Andalites and save the Earth. However, it all comes at a terrible price. Not all of them came away from the Pool Ship unharmed. While some of Animorphs use their skills and fame to thrive in the years following the war, others sink further into despair. Jake, in particular, is unable to come to terms with the decisions that he was forced to make in the heat of battle. In some ways, he worries that he was as bad as Visser One.

Yet, even though the Yeerks have been defeated, danger still lurks at the edge of space. An entity that calls itself the One has begun to move, capturing any ship that it encounters and assimilating its crew into a greater whole. When Ax becomes a victim of the creature, the Andalite’s turn to the remaining Animorphs for assistance. However, are the Animorphs prepared relinquish their safety and head into battle once again?

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City of Glass

Please note that this review may contain spoilers for earlier instalments of this series. You can read my reviews of these novels by clicking the links below:

City of Bones | City of Ashes

City of Glass was written by Cassandra Clare and first published in 2009. It is the third instalment of The Mortal Instruments series and was preceded by City of Bones (2007) and City of Ashes (2008), and followed by City of Fallen Angels (2011), City of Lost Souls (2012) and City of Heavenly Fire (2014). Since then, Clare has also published a prequel trilogy titled The Infernal Devices and a sequel series under the name of The Dark Artifices, as well as a spin-off collection of short stories titled The Bane Chronicles which focus on the flamboyant warlock Magnus Bane.

Clary Fray has finally has something that could help save her mother – the name of the warlock who created the potion that put her in a coma. The only problem is that the warlock lives in Idris, the city of the Shadowhunters, and this is somewhere that Jace thinks that she should not go. Clary’s powers are unnatural and he fears how the Clave will react when they learn that she can create new runes.

Jace and the other Shadowhunters try to leave without her, but things go wrong when they are suddenly attacked by a demon. Their only hope of survival is to escape to Idris, yet in doing so Jace drags Simon along with him. This causes immediate complications, as Downworlders are forbidden from entering the City of Glass. Furious with what they have done, Clary recklessly follows and winds up transporting herself and Luke to a lake, miles away from the safety of the city walls.

Clary soon learns that she has not picked the best time to visit the city. The Clave is in session to discuss what should be done about the rising threat of Valentine. It’s not long before the rogue Shadowhunter mounts an attack on the city, giving all who live there the choice to join him or die. Up until now, all Clary has worried about is her mother and forbidden love for Jace. Now, she realises that she is possibly the only one who can save the Shadowhunters from a fate worse than death…

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Storm

Please note that this review may contain spoilers for earlier instalments of this series. You can read my reviews of these novels by clicking the links below:

Sea | Sky

Storm was written by Sarah Driver and first published in 2018. It forms the final part of The Huntress Trilogy and is preceded by Sea (2017) and Sky (2017). The story follows Mouse on her continuing quest to find the legendary Storm-Opals and save her homeland from an eternal winter. As this is part of trilogy, I would certainly recommend reading the novels in sequence if you want to have any idea of what is going on.

Mouse managed to rescue her father and protect the Hackles but the battle against Stag is far from over. Clouds have filled the skies, cutting off the light from the moon and causing the seas to freeze over. She knows that the only way to stop this is to find the Land-Opal and place it and its sisters in the crown. The only trouble is that she is still no closer to finding out where the crown is.

Worse still, Stag has put out a bounty for any one with Beast-Chatter. Now Leopard and her father are too scared to allow her to leave the mountain for fear that she is captured. For Mouse, this is the worst punishment. She can’t sit idle when her quest is far from complete. She knows that it’s her destiny to find the Opals and she can’t complete this while she’s locked away.

When Leopard disappears on a mission to the Frozen Wastes, Mouse knows that she can wait no longer. Taking the captured Fangtooth, Axe-Thrower, with her as a guide, she heads off to rescue her. However, the world has changed a lot while Mouse has been in the mountain and is now more dangerous than she could imagine. Stag is no longer the biggest threat to her safety. Others now seek the Storm-Opals, and if they get hold of them it will mean the end of everything…

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Animorphs 50-53

Please note that this review may contain spoilers for earlier instalments of this series. You can read my reviews of these novels by clicking the links below:

Animorphs: 1-5 | 6-10 | 11-15 | 16-19 | 20-22 | 23-27 | 28-32 | 33-37 | 38-41 | 42-45 | 46-49

Megamorphs: The Andalite’s Gift | In the Time of Dinosaurs | Elfangor’s Secret | Back to Before

Animorphs Chronicles: The Andalite Chronicles | The Hork-Bajir Chronicles | Visser | The Ellimist Chronicles

If this is the first of my retrospective posts that you have seen; welcome. This is where I’ve been gradually taking a look back at one of my childhood obsessions – K.A. Applegate’s epic Animorphs series. This science fiction series ran for fifty-four books (as well as a bunch of specials) and was published between 1996 and 2001. For the purpose of this review, I’m going to be looking at books fifty through fifty-three only – The Ultimate, The Absolute, The Sacrifice and The Answer. Oh, and there will be spoilers

The end that the Animorphs feared has finally come. The Yeerks have discovered their identities and forced them into hiding. Although most of the Animorphs managed to at least save their parents, Jake was not so lucky. Now he struggles with his depression, knowing that his mum and dad could well be Controllers. To make matters worse, Visser One has declared open warfare. There is no hiding now. The Yeerks seem to have won.

Yet the Animorphs will not accept defeat so easily. There is now no time to play fair. Jake and the others know that the only way that they can win is to take risks and do things that they previously would never have dreamed of. They share the morphing technology with others to bolster their ranks, make contact with politicians and members of the military, and even launch a final attempt to destroy the Yeerk Pool beneath the city.

Finally, they find themselves in a unique position to mount an attack on the most valuable ship in the Yeerk armada – the Pool Ship. With the help of unexpected allies, they launch a full-scale assault on the vessel. Their victory could very well save the human race. However, Jake knows that there is a good chance that, this time, they may not all make it out alive…

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The Ellimist Chronicles

Please note that this review may contain spoilers for earlier instalments of this series. You can read my reviews of these novels by clicking the links below:

Animorphs: 1-5 | 6-10 | 11-15 | 16-19 | 20-22 | 23-27 | 28-32 | 33-37 | 38-41 | 42-45 | 46-49

Megamorphs: The Andalite’s Gift | In the Time of Dinosaurs | Elfangor’s Secret | Back to Before

Animorphs Chronicles: The Andalite Chronicles | The Hork-Bajir Chronicles | Visser

Well, it’s been an age and for that I can only apologise, but I think it’s about time I pushed through the remaining Animorphs books and finished up this long-running series of retrospective reviews.

In case this the first of these that you’ve read one of these, this is my look back over my childhood favourite series – Animorphs by K.A. Applegate. The main series ran for fifty-four novels and focused on five teenagers who were given the power to become any animal they could touch in order to battle invading parasitic aliens. The series was also complimented by a number of specials and spin-off novels and it is the last of these that I am going to look at today. The Ellimist Chronicles was first published in 2000 and focuses on one of the series’ most mysterious characters. While the book can really be read at any point in the series after The Attack (book twenty-six), it is intended to fall after The Resistance, which is the forty-seventh instalment of the main series.

You should probably be aware that this review contains spoilers. You have been warned.

Before he was known as the Ellimist, he was Azure Level, Seven Spar, Extension Two, Down-Messenger, Forty-one. Or Toomin to his friends. Toomin was a Ketran – a peaceful species that lived in symbiosis with the floating crystals of his home world, but he was not a very accomplished one. While successful Ketrans became scientists or engineers, Toomin and his friends wasted time by playing immersive simulation games. However, he wasn’t even very good at that. Toomin was determined to win games through compassion but aggression almost always seems to be the winning strategy.

When Toomin is awarded a position on an experimental spacecraft, he is overjoyed. Perhaps it is finally time to stop playing games and make something of himself. Yet things quickly go wrong. A different tribe of Ketran have developed a way of sending communications beyond their planet and foolishly tested it by broadcasting a game without explanation. Thinking that the Ketrans pose a threat, a rival alien race arrives and wipes them out without warning. With no hope but to flee, Toomin and small group of others escape in their ship. They know that they are now the last of the Ketrans and – removed from their home crystal – they are shadow of their former selves.

This unthinkable tragedy sets in motion a string of events that causes a transformation in Toomin. He finds himself facing horrors that he could never have imagined but emerges from them changed – with knowledge and powers that far exceed anything else. He decides to put these to use by playing the ultimate game – one that helps him to preserve and advance other species. However, its not long before a rival player emerges and the Crayak’s motivations are far less altruistic than his own…

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