The Scratchling Trinity

The Scratchling Trinity was written by Boyd Brent and first published in 2017. It is a middle grade fantasy novel which focuses on a young boy’s discovery of a time-travelling secret society. Although the novel reads as though it is the first part of a series, at the time of writing no further instalments have been announced.

Max Hastings thinks that his luck has finally come in when he wins a prize – a lifetime membership to the Ancient Order of Wall Scratchings – in a school draw. He heads off to Manor House in London to receive his prize, only to discover that no such organisation exists. Max is quick to realise that the Order actually operates in secret beneath the building from a magical pocket dimension called the Cusp of Time. It is here that he learns that he is really a Scratchling, and is destined to help others like himself.

You see, it has long been known that when a child is in danger, they only need to scratch a message onto a wall and help will find them. This is the job of the Ancient Order of Wall Scratchings – to dispatch a young agent to the required point in time to save a life and change the past. However, they must act fast. A rival organisation called the League of Dark Scratchlings is forever working against them and their motives are far less altruistic.

It’s not long before Max is sent on his first mission – to rescue an orphan named Eric Kettle from a boarding school in 1840. With the help of a veteran Scratchling named Ellie Swanson, he must avoid the headmaster’s cruel henchmen and reach Eric before it is too late. If he fails, Eric will starve to death or, worse still, be brainwashed and corrupted by the Dark Scratchlings…

More

Advertisements

Happy New Year!

Hello Everyone!

Now that The Sobeks are over, it’s time to start looking forward to what this year has to bring. I’ve decided to take a break from my scheduled reviews to do something a little more exciting. Over January, I’m going to be looking at a few things that I didn’t have time to get to before Christmas – one final festive submission and the books that I received from LibraryThing‘s secret santa event – but then I’m going to finish up the month with a few brand new releases.

Will it be a positive glimpse of what is yet to come, or will it make me want to return to the safety of 2017. Check back over the next few weeks to find out!

Without further ado, here is what’s coming up in January on Arkham Reviews:

Footprints in the Snow by Maggie Holman

The Scratchling Trinity by Boyd Brent

The Summer Prince by Alaya Dawn Johnson

The Girl Who Dared to Think by Bella Forrest

The Hazel Wood by Melissa Albert

Chainbreaker by Tara Sim

Everless by Sara Holland

Runaways: An Original Novel by Christopher Golden

The Sobeks 2017 – Part 4

Hello everyone.

Happy New Year! I hope you had a fantastic 2017 and are all ready to see what 2018 brings. I, for one, am really excited to discover some new favourite authors and series. My resolution is, as always, to post as many honest reviews as possible. Yet, before I get stuck into this year’s reviews, it’s time for my final look back on the gems of 2017.

In case you missed my previous posts, The Sobeks are my yearly blog awards. Rather than declare any one book as being the best, it is a look back at all of the stand-out novels that I read in 2017. These are the ones that I awarded 4 or 5 stars to on Goodreads. As you know, I’m a pretty critical reader so this is high praise indeed!

Read on if you’d like to learn about the best books that I read between October and December.

More

The Sobeks 2017 – Part 3

Hello everyone.

Is your Christmas money burning a hole in your pocket? To help you decide how to spend it, I thought I’d spend a few posts telling you about the very best novels that I have read this year. All of these books were worthy of a 4 or 5 star review on Goodreads and, as you know how fussy I can be, this means that I was absolutely blown away by them.

In today’s post, I’m going to be reminiscing about the books I read between July and September. Over this time, there was a decent number of books that made the cut. Read on for a wide variety of recommendations, links to my full reviews and adorable photographs of Sobek.

More

The Sobeks 2017 – Part 2

Hello everyone, and welcome to my run down of the best books that I read in 2017. If you missed my last post, these are the novels that I gave 4+ stars to on Goodreads – the ones that I found utterly engrossing and would recommend to everyone.

Unfortunately, this list is kind of short. Over this time I read fewer books as I took an exam and started a new job, and unfortunately most of those that I did read failed to earn this highly prestigious and sought-after literary award.

Anyhow, without further ado, here is the list of gems that I discovered between April and June:

More

Shadow Girl

Shadow Girl was written by Liana Liu and first published in 2017. It is a work of contemporary fiction which focuses on a teenage girl’s experiences while tutoring the eight-year-old daughter of a wealthy businessman. The novel stands alone, so you don’t have to read any of the author’s other work to fully appreciate it.

Mei has always striven to be a good girl. Since her father walked out on them and her brother turned to drink and petty theft, she has taken it upon herself to do everything that she can to make her mother’s life easier. Since she has always had a way with children, Mei spends her free time tutoring youths to help pay the bills.

When Vanessa Morison, wealthy wife of a famous business man, hires her to be the summer tutor for her daughter, Mei is initially reluctant. The job will mean leaving home for two months to live with the Morisons on their vast island estate. However, Vanessa is offering to pay her a fortune and Mei really can’t pass up the opportunity to earn so much money.

However, Mei might have bitten off more than she can chew. The Morisons are not the easiest people to live with – especially Vanessa’s stepson, Henry. Eight-year-old Ella is also not what Mei was expecting. The girl is shy and withdrawn, and it’s not long before Mei learns why. Ella is visited every night by the disturbed ghost of Eleanor Arrow – a previous inhabitant of the mansion. It’s not long before Mei also begins to see the spirit. Could it be that Eleanor is real, or is she just a symptom of a bigger problem on the island…

More

Shadowblack

Please note that this review may contain spoilers for Spellslinger. You can read my review of this novel [here].

Shadowblack was written by Sebastien de Castell and first published in 2017. It is the second part of the Spellslinger series and is preceded by Spellslinger (2017). The third instalment – Charmcaster – is expected to be released in May 2018. As Shadowblack carries on shortly after its prequel left off, I would advise reading them in sequence to have any idea of what is going on.

Kellen is finding it hard to adapt to life as an outlaw. Reichis’s attempted heists just seem to get him beaten up and Ferius hasn’t even tried to teach him the ways of the Argosi. Despite everything that his family did to him, he still finds that he longs to return to his people but even that is impossible. The Jan’Tep have placed a death warrant on his head and it’s unlikely that they will lift it unless he can find a cure for his shadowblack.

Things take an unexpected turn when Kellen meets another Argosi on the road. The newcomer calls herself the Path of Thorns and Roses and has some kind of history with Ferius. She is also in the process of escorting Seneira – a blindfolded girl who is not blind – back to her father at the Academy of Teleidos.

The mission seems simple enough, but unexpected dangers lie in wait in the desert city. The shadowblack is spreading and it’s not just magic users that are in danger. As Kellen and his friends search for the source of the outbreak, he meets Dexan Videris – a spellslinger who claims that he has a way of curing the disease. Kellen could well have found his ticket back into Jan’Tep society, but in making a deal with Dexan he could damage his friendship with Ferius beyond repair. Is the spellslinger telling the truth, or is he somehow connected to the spread of the shadowblack?

More

dEaDINBURGH: Vantage

dEaDINBURGH: Vantage was written by Mark Wilson and first published in 2014. It is a horror story, focusing on two teens as they try to survive in a zombie infested Scottish city. The novel forms the first part of the Din Eidyn Corpus series and is followed by dEaDINBURGH: Alliances (2015), dEaDINBURGH: Origins (2015) and dEaDINBURGH: Hunted (2016).

For hundreds of years the plague mutated beneath Mary King’s Close, slowly reanimating the long dead victims and giving them a hunger for human flesh. When they first began to rise from their graves, people initially thought it was a hoax. It wasn’t until the disease began to spread and the power went out that they realised how much trouble they were in. Soon after, the government walled Edinburgh off from the rest of the world. At first, the survivors believed that a rescue would come. However, as the years ticked by, they soon realised that they had been abandoned.

Joey MacLeod was born within the zombie-infested city and has never known a different life. He has been raised by the Brotherhood – a sect of monks who worship the zombies – and fears the day that they will force him to take his vows, giving up life on the surface forever. Alys Shephard’s life could not be more different. She has grown up as part of an all-female commune and been trained since childhood to protect herself from both zombies and men. Alys feels nothing but contempt for the Brotherhood, until the fateful day that Joey saves her life.

An unlikely friendship is forged between the two, but it is put to the test when a sinister man named Bracha targets the people closest to them. Learning that Bracha is searching for a cure for the disease, the two of them set off across Edinburgh to find it and have their revenge. However, to locate Bracha they will need to cross into territory belonging to the Exalted – a cult who believe that the living should be fed to the dead…

More

Days of Blood and Starlight

Please note that this review may contain spoilers for Daughter of Smoke and Bone. You can read my review of this novel [here].

Days of Blood and Starlight was written in by Laini Taylor and first published in 2012. It is the second book in the Daughter of Smoke and Bone series and is preceded by Daughter of Smoke and Bone (2011) and followed by Dreams of Gods and Monsters (2014) and the spin-off novella, Night of Cake and Puppets (2013). As the story picks up shortly after its prequel left off, you really need to read the books in sequence to have any idea of what is going on.

When Karou broke the wishbone with Akiva, everything changed. The memories of her life as Madrigal came flooding back to her, bringing with them the shame of her treason. Learning what Akiva did to Brimstone was the final straw, sending her fleeing to Eretz to see what became of the Loramendi for herself. In its ashes, she finds Thiago – the man who once executed her – and accepts her fate as the new resurrectionist of the chimaera army.

Akiva returns to his people broken and world-weary. When his search for Karou uncovers a thurible bearing her name, he convinces himself that she must have perished. As the seraphim, under the lead of their ruthless general, Jael, begin to turn their wrath on unarmed chimaera farmers, Akiva begins to do all that he can to keep Karou’s memory alive by sabotaging their attempts by night.

However, Akiva and Madrigal’s dream of peace seems further away than ever. As the seraphim target the weak and unarmed, Thiago retaliates by tasking Karou with building more powerful bodies for his men – over-muscled and able to match the seraphim in flight. It seems as though both sides will fight until they wipe each other out, until an old friend delivers a message to Karou, offering a different way to end the conflict…  More

The Last Namsara

The Last Namsara was first published in 2017 and is Kristen Ciccarelli’s debut novel. It is a high fantasy story which focuses on a princess who must slay an ancient dragon to earn her freedom. The story forms the first part of the Iskari series, and its sequel is expected to be released in Autumn 2018.

Asha is the Iskari – hated and feared by the people of Firgaard due to a terrible accident that half-destroyed the city and left her brutally scarred. An accident that was entirely her fault. As penance, she now hunts the dragons that infest the surrounding lands. Although people may never truly trust her, they can’t deny the fact that she is the most skilled dragon slayer in the land. However, no one knows that she lures the creatures by speaking forbidden stories.

However, Asha’s time as a dragon slayer is coming to an end. In just seven days, she is to wed Jarek – a vicious and controlling military commander. Once Jarek is her husband, Asha knows that she will be forced to obey him or face his rage. Everything seems hopeless until her father – the Dragon King – offers her a chance to break off the engagement. If Asha can kill the oldest of the dragons – Kovu – her father agrees to grant her the freedom that she craves.

However, the hunt will be the most dangerous of her life. Kovu is ancient and powerful, and nothing but the deadliest of stories will lure him. However, as political tensions within the city begin to threaten her hunt, Asha finds her fate entwined with that of one of Jarek’s slaves. Will Asha succeed in her quest, or will she meet the same tragic fate as the heroines in her stories?

More

Previous Older Entries

Blog Stats

  • 31,690 awesome people have visited this blog

© Kim Dyer and Arkham Reviews, 2016. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Kim Dyer and Arkham Reviews with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

All novels reviewed on this site are © to their respective authors.